Hello & Welcome to our community. Is this your first visit? Register
Follow us on
Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter Linked In Flickr Watch us on YouTube My Space Blogger
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 44
  1. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    9,122
    Dick Hyde, a relief pitcher in the late 1950s for the original Washington Senators, died on 4/15 at age 91.

    After a late season call-up to the Senators in 1955, he returned and became a key performer for Washington's bullpen from 1957-59. His best year was 1958, when he finished with a 10-3 record, a 1.75 ERA and led the AL with 44 games finished and 19 saves. He also served on the Senators' staff in 1960, before closing out his time in The Show with the Orioles in 1961.

    Dave Miedema




  2. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    9,122
    Bob Oliver, who played 7 consecutive seasons in The Show after a brief September call-up a few years earlier, died on 4/19 at age 77.

    Playing the outfield and the infield corner positions, the Pirates gave him a small taste of the show when promoting him to the Bigs (3 games) in 1965.
    After that, he had his best years with the Royals, a full-timer from 1969-71. His top season was 1970, slugging 27 HR and driving in 99.

    Beginning the 1972 season in KC, Oliver was dealt to the Angels early that year. After his stint in Anaheim, he ended up with the Orioles and then the Yankees.

    Dave Miedema




  3. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    9,122
    Dan Walters, a catcher who played for the Padres in parts of 1992 and 1993, died on 4/22 at age 53.

    Dave Miedema


  4. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    9,122
    Rich Hacker, a SS for 18 games with the 1971 Expos, died on 4/22 at age 72.

    Dave Miedema




  5. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    9,122
    Bobby Winkles, who managed both the Angels and the A's in the 1970s and skippered Arizona State in NCAA baseball, died 4/17 at age 90, He also served as a coach for the White Sox.

    Dave Miedema



  6. #26
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    40
    Quote Originally Posted by sox83cubs84 View Post
    Dan Walters, a catcher who played for the Padres in parts of 1992 and 1993, died on 4/22 at age 53.

    Dave Miedema
    Dan Walters' story is a sad one.



    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.72)]San Diego, CA – Retired San Diego Police Department (SDPD) Officer Dan Walters died in the line of duty on Thursday April 23, 2020, due to complications associated with being shot in the neck and hit by a car in 2003.[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.72)]
    Officer Walters had been on the force for five years when he and his partner responded to help a fellow officer with a traffic stop at approximately 10:30 p.m. on Nov. 12, 2003, KGTV reported.
    They later learned that the officer they went to assist had interrupted a domestic disturbance in progress, and that the suspect had opened fire on him, hitting him in his handcuffs. At the time, all Officer Walters saw when he arrived at the scene was a terrified colleague scrambling for cover, he told The San Diego Union-Tribune in a 2013 interview.

    “As we rolled up, I saw this officer on his hands and knees, desperately crawling for cover with this frightened look on his face and with his gun drawn,” he recalled. “I immediately thought, ‘Oh, s--t!’ and jumped out of the car.”
    [/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.72)]
    He ran to the frantic officer just as the suspect closed in on him.
    “Here’s this gunman coming directly at me from about 12 to 15 feet with a gun pointed directly at my face,” Officer Walters told The San Diego Union-Tribune. “He didn’t shoot immediately. He kept advancing and stopped at about arm’s length.” Officer Walters essentially had no time to react. “In that moment, I decided I wasn’t going to let him just stand there and shoot me in the face, so I lunged for the gun, missed, then grabbed him, attempting to get him to the ground and wait for help,” he recalled. “He put the gun to the back of my neck and fired.”
    [/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.72)]
    As he collapsed onto the ground in the middle of 43rd Street, Officer Walters believed that he was going to die.
    “I felt nothing,” he said. “I was looking straight up and I again thought: ‘I can’t believe I’m dead.’ Then, it all went black.”
    [/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.72)]
    As Officer Walters fell unconscious, his partner opened fire on the shooter, killing him.
    Just then, a motorist passed by and inadvertently struck the wounded officer as he was lying in the middle of the roadway. “They found me with my feet sticking out from under the car,” Officer Walters told The San Diego Tribune. Two of his cervical vertebrae were crushed, among other injuries.

    [/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.72)]He regained consciousness just as additional officers and medical personnel arrived at the scene, and immediately realized that he couldn’t get his body to move. “I remember them putting me in the ambulance, and I thinking if I can survive this, do I want to live being paralyzed?” Officer Walters told The San Diego Union-Tribune. “I was breathing OK, but I couldn’t feel anything below my neck. I couldn’t move a muscle."

    Officer Walters, who was just 37 years old at the time of the attack, never regained use of his legs or his right arm. He had only minor use of his left arm and hand. Despite the severity of his injuries, Officer Walters said he still would have run to his fellow officer’s aid if he had it all to do over again. “I certainly don’t regret being at the scene that night,” he told The San Diego Union-Tribune. “Perhaps people were saved because I happened to be there.”
    [/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.72)]
    Prior to his career in law enforcement, Officer Walters had a 13-year baseball career as a catcher.
    He was drafted by the Houston Astros in 1984, and was later traded to the San Diego Padres in 1989. His baseball career ended in 1996 after suffering a spinal injury in spring training.

    He underwent successful spinal surgery and embarked on his goal of becoming a police officer. Dr. Steve Albrecht said he first met Officer Walters in 1996 when they worked out together in El Cajon. “I loved him dearly,” Albrecht said. “He came on the PD with two steel rods in his spine from his baseball injury. He chose to start a tough job that causes most people to retire. It’s so sad and ironic that he made his living with his body, as a pro ball player and a cop, to then get paralyzed.”

    [/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.72)]Officer Walters, 53, lived in constant physical and emotional pain over the course of the 16-plus years since the shooting. “He lived through so many serious infections, had to take so many medications…” Albrecht told The San Diego Union-Tribune. “I know that he is no longer in pain.”

    Although he would never admit it, Officer Walters was “a hell of a motivational speaker,” Albrecht added.
    [/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.72)]“His best friend on the PD was Chris Wilson, who was killed on duty in 2010,” he said. “He spoke at Chris’ funeral and you could have heard a pin drop.”

    [/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.72)]Officer Walters never married and had no children, The San Diego-Union Tribune reported.[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.72)]His parents have passed away. Officer Walters is survived by his sister, Trisha Turner.

    On a personal note, Dan Walters and I both went to the same high school, Santana High, in Santee, CA. I graduated in 1980, and Dan graduated in 1984.

    Steve
    [/COLOR]

  7. #27
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    40
    Quote Originally Posted by sox83cubs84 View Post
    Dan Walters, a catcher who played for the Padres in parts of 1992 and 1993, died on 4/22 at age 53.

    Dave Miedema
    OK, I don't know what happened above, so let's try it again.

    Dan Walters' story is a sad one.

    Retired San Diego Police Department (SDPD) Officer Dan Walters died in the line of duty on Thursday April 23, 2020, due to complications associated with being shot in the neck and hit by a car in 2003.


    Officer Walters had been on the force for five years when he and his partner responded to help a fellow officer with a traffic stop at approximately 10:30 p.m. on Nov. 12, 2003. They later learned that the officer they went to assist had interrupted a domestic disturbance in progress, and that the suspect had opened fire on him, hitting him in his handcuffs. At the time, all Officer Walters saw when he arrived at the scene was a terrified colleague scrambling for cover, he told the San Diego Union-Tribune in a 2013 interview.

    “As we rolled up, I saw this officer on his hands and knees, desperately crawling for cover with this frightened look on his face and with his gun drawn,” he recalled. “I immediately thought, ‘Oh, s--t!’ and jumped out of the car.”

    He ran to the frantic officer just as the suspect closed in on him. “Here’s this gunman coming directly at me from about 12 to 15 feet with a gun pointed directly at my face,” Officer Walters told The San Diego Union-Tribune. “He didn’t shoot immediately. He kept advancing and stopped at about arm’s length.” Officer Walters essentially had no time to react. “In that moment, I decided I wasn’t going to let him just stand there and shoot me in the face, so I lunged for the gun, missed, then grabbed him, attempting to get him to the ground and wait for help,” he recalled. “He put the gun to the back of my neck and fired.”

    As he collapsed onto the ground in the middle of 43rd Street, Officer Walters believed that he was going to die. “I felt nothing,” he said. “I was looking straight up and I again thought: ‘I can’t believe I’m dead.’ Then, it all went black.”

    As Officer Walters fell unconscious, his partner opened fire on the shooter, killing him. Just then, a motorist passed by and inadvertently struck the wounded officer as he was lying in the middle of the roadway. “They found me with my feet sticking out from under the car,” Officer Walters told The San Diego Tribune. Two of his cervical vertebrae were crushed, among other injuries.

    He regained consciousness just as additional officers and medical personnel arrived at the scene, and immediately realized that he couldn’t get his body to move. “I remember them putting me in the ambulance, and I thinking if I can survive this, do I want to live being paralyzed?” Officer Walters told The San Diego Union-Tribune. “I was breathing OK, but I couldn’t feel anything below my neck. I couldn’t move a muscle."

    Officer Walters, who was just 37 years old at the time of the attack, never regained use of his legs or his right arm. He had only minor use of his left arm and hand. Despite the severity of his injuries, Officer Walters said he still would have run to his fellow officer’s aid if he had it all to do over again. “I certainly don’t regret being at the scene that night,” he told The San Diego Union-Tribune. “Perhaps people were saved because I happened to be there.”

    Prior to his career in law enforcement, Officer Walters had a 13-year baseball career as a catcher. He was drafted by the Houston Astros in 1984, and was later traded to the San Diego Padres in 1989. His baseball career ended in 1996 after suffering a spinal injury in spring training.

    He underwent successful spinal surgery and embarked on his goal of becoming a police officer. Dr. Steve Albrecht said he first met Officer Walters in 1996 when they worked out together in El Cajon. “I loved him dearly,” Albrecht said. “He came on the PD with two steel rods in his spine from his baseball injury. He chose to start a tough job that causes most people to retire. It’s so sad and ironic that he made his living with his body, as a pro ball player and a cop, to then get paralyzed.”

    Officer Walters, 53, lived in constant physical and emotional pain over the course of the 16-plus years since the shooting. “He lived through so many serious infections, had to take so many medications…” Albrecht told The San Diego Union-Tribune. “I know that he is no longer in pain.”

    Although he would never admit it, Officer Walters was “a hell of a motivational speaker,” Albrecht added.

    “His best friend on the PD was Chris Wilson, who was killed on duty in 2010,” he said. “He spoke at Chris’ funeral and you could have heard a pin drop.”

    Officer Walters never married and had no children, The San Diego-Union Tribune reported.
    His parents have passed away. Officer Walters is survived by his sister, Trisha Turner.

    On a personal note, Dan Walters and I both went to the same high school, Santana High, in Santee, CA. I graduated in 1980, and Dan graduated in 1984.

    Steve

  8. #28
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    40
    Here's Officer Dan Walters' picture with the SDPD.


    Name:  officer-dan-walters.jpg
Views: 48
Size:  72.6 KB

  9. #29
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    9,122
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve D View Post
    Here's Officer Dan Walters' picture with the SDPD.


    Name:  officer-dan-walters.jpg
Views: 48
Size:  72.6 KB
    You are correct. Walters was far more valuable AFTER his MLB career than during it. RIP, Officer Walters.

    Dave Miedema

  10. #30
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    9,122
    Steve Dalkowski, a legendary minor league flamethrower in the Orioles system in the late 1950s/early 1960s, died on 4/26 at age 80 due to COVID19.

    Dalkowski threw some of the strongest heat in pro baseball history, but also was very terrible at control and command of his pitches. His career inspired the producers of Bull Durham to insert one of the main characters of the movie, Nuke Laloosh.

    Dave Miedema



 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:50 PM.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.5
Copyright © 2020 vBulletin Solutions Inc. All rights reserved.
vBulletin Skin By: PurevB.com